Poisoned by Lies and Hypocrisy

America's First Attempt to Bring Liberty to Canada, 1775–1776
by Gavin K. Watt.


After a four-year absence in England, Governor Guy Carleton returned to Canada and discovered that political unrest in the American colonies was at a fever pitch. Soon after, open warfare erupted in Massachusetts, which was quickly followed by a rebel invasion of Canada.



The Revolution’s first two campaigns are viewed through these windows.

  • American reaction to the “intolerable” Quebec Act.
  • Disruption of Canadian and native mobilization by rebel agents.
  • Rabid persecution of the rebels’ political opponents.
  • Liberty delivered by invasion and Carleton’s perplexing reaction.
  • Defence of Quebec City by Canadian militia, American loyalists, British Regulars and sailors.
  • Valour of Canadians, natives and loyalists in expelling the invaders.
  • Remarkable naval build-up on Lake Champlain.
  • King George’s disappointment with the results of Carleton’s 1776 campaign.



REVIEWS AND COMMENTS
 

By M. Anderson 2014

The strengths of this work are in some of its key details, particularly examination of cross-border loyalist activity between New York and Canada, and Canadian Indian participation in the early part of the war. It also incorporates a few new primary sources of some merit.

It is a useful complement to other works on this campaign with its Canadian loyalist focus.

Col. Kim R.Stacy (Ret.), 84th Regiment of Foot (R.H.E.), PonteVedra, Fl

I just finished the book up. Very nice summary of a complicated period of time.Well done again. Cheers. Kim

M. Anderson - March 31, 2014

The strengths of this work are in some of its key details, particularly examination of cross-border loyalist activity between New York and Canada, and Canadian Indian participation in the early part of the war. It also incorporates a few new primary sources of some merit.

On the other hand, Watt relies heavily on standard Canadian loyalist accounts for much of the narrative, and provides very little analysis to explain the campaign's outcomes. The book does not even develop an overarching theme to support its bold title (which is a quotation from a loyalist critique of Continental Congress messages, that Watt only describes as a historical episode).

It is a useful complement to other works on this campaign with its Canadian loyalist focus.

JP - October 9, 2014

good information, tends to jump around from subject to subject, but having read most of Mr. Watt's books, you expect that.


 

Gavin Watt has studied Canada’s role in the American Revolution for forty years and has nine books published on the subject. He pursues a life-long interest in military history and has re-enacted in four historical eras. Gavin is a honourary Vice-President of the United Empire Loyalists’ Association and often speaks at historical societies’ meetings.

© 2017 Gavin K. Watt • website design by Wavelength Media
Gavin K. Watt - Historian & Writer